This is where adland collects our fifteen megabytes of fame. If you want to check out and contact the crew, do so under that link.
Press can be quoting us, using us as reference, or simply interviewing us. Adland was founded Åsk Dabitch Wäppling back in 1996. It began as a passion project, collecting recent ad campaigns, pairing up badland ads and as an outlet to adrant on recent happenings in the ad industry. As it grew, with a discussion mailing list and much mail generated daily, it became a database-driven website collecting great (and not so great) ads serving many caustic comments and editorials on the advertising industry. Some called it a blog, but we do not. The site has been used as resource or quoted by the New York Times (USA), Adweek (USA), Marketing Mag (Canada), the Library of Congress, Spiegel (DE), CNN Money (USA), Media Guardian (UK), Resumé (SE), Adformatie (NL), Campaign magazine (UK), Creativity (USA), Svenska Dagbladet (SE), Dagens Industri (SE), Brand Equity (IN), Børsen (DK) and many many more.
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David Giantasio writes about "Mudvertising" what is it, and why are marketers diving in?

Needing a good dirty quote, he naturally contacted yours truly for one. Ha! I slay me. Go read the full article, it's three pages.

The benefit for marketers is clear, as mudventure events attract demos brands crave. Participants generally fall into the 18-40 sweet spot, with an average household income in the $70,000 range. Some event series, including Tough Mudder, are male-oriented (the split is about 70/30), but the events are attracting more women. (There's a female-only series called Dirty Girl.)

Really? Whining? For me, "If you don't laugh you'll cry" and "it's funny because it's true" come to mind faster than the word whining, but then I was spitting out the majority of adland-jokes in a manic frenzy while cackling loudly like a crazy woman. For a moment there I was afraid someone would arrive with a nice hug-myself-jacket and take me away. In the hashtag some people were humblebragging, others dropping serious gossip under the guise of a joke. OK, that was me.

Adage wonders if "folks" are just having a laugh or sharing some harsh truths about the industry. The correct answer is BOTH mate.

The hashtag, which was fueled by the blog Adland, caught on like wildfire today in the span of just a few hours, with hundreds of tweets by ad people eager to poke some fun at themselves and blow off some steam. Makes sense; ad folks usually tend to have a good sense of humor. But many people were expressing that the missives didn't feel like mere jokes and rang a bit too close to home.

Below is the storify collection of as many as I managed to grab, if you both laugh and wipe away tears, it's all good.

Well well, this is pretty neat as our smirk graces the Economic Times India's "Brand Equity" on Wednesday morning. It's a look at the ad archives like ourselves and legends like Kim Shaw from BestadsonTV. We shared a few back and fourth emails with the journalist Shephali Bhatt pondering how we collect these ads, and what we do they they turn out to be scam ads or ghost ads.

How do you normally deal with controversies?

I pour gasoline on them and get marshmallows.

Well a merry christmas to us! Adland has had "ad serving disabled" without warning by our dear pals the Google Adsense folks. What did we do? Serve gore to you. It's the top five of PETA's most sexist ads that offends, as there's a woman being clubbed to have her fur stolen, and some lowly mostly nude interns sweating in cellophane in the hot Memphis sun that have blood on them. Like anything PETA, it's a very popular post, partly due to the offensiveness of the imagery. Not sure if it's the nudity or gore that got caught in Google's defunkt algorithm.

Mediapost gave Pereira & O'Dell "bronze" for social agency of 2012, quotes our opinion on their Skype campaign.

“It’s Time For Skype” uses print, outdoor and Web iterations to position the Internet-based voice and video communications service as a warmer, more human way to connect than alternatives like Twitter and Facebook.

“140 characters doesn’t equal staying in touch,” reads one copy line. “When did it become ok to text mom happy birthday?” asks another. The campaign’s main social thrust consists of an app on Skype’s Facebook page that lets users create and share “Humoticons” — pictures of themselves expressing emotions.

So Fast Chat: Åsk Wäppling
The legendary ad blogger on Instagram creatives, brands riding the Reddit wave, and how agencies can save themselves
. Oh my, the words "legendary" and "renowned" have me suffering from "gigantic head". It'll pass.

Let's talk about agencies. Are we looking at the last days of the traditional agency? Are creatives going to stop making ads and start making products? And if so, should they get out of the ad business entirely?

Been spotted in a highly flattering review "Meet The 22 Most Influential Advertising Bloggers" in Business Insider. They sum it up with:

There's a plethora of content, including a massive library of Super Bowl ads. While the content relies on submissions, host Dabitch still puts out some of the best editorials on the web.

Our cheeks are now competing with our hair in chromatic color. Thanks, man.

Meanwhile Brandrepublic puts us at #6 out of 100 choice blogs.

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