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Press can be quoting us, using us as reference, or simply interviewing us. Adland was founded Åsk Dabitch Wäppling back in 1996. It began as a passion project, collecting recent ad campaigns, pairing up badland ads and as an outlet to adrant on recent happenings in the ad industry. As it grew, with a discussion mailing list and much mail generated daily, it became a database-driven website collecting great (and not so great) ads serving many caustic comments and editorials on the advertising industry. Some called it a blog, but we do not. The site has been used as resource or quoted by the New York Times (USA), Adweek (USA), Marketing Mag (Canada), the Library of Congress, Spiegel (DE), CNN Money (USA), Media Guardian (UK), Resumé (SE), Adformatie (NL), Campaign magazine (UK), Creativity (USA), Svenska Dagbladet (SE), Dagens Industri (SE), Brand Equity (IN), Børsen (DK) and many many more.
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2011-03-01Metro Sweden picked up on our ban from Google. Here's a machine translation of the article.

The Swedish advertising blog Adland.tv has been banned by Google Adsense, Dagens Media. This is because Google believes that her post is too daring.
- Well, apparently Google believes we serve our readers porn. I can not help but laugh, says Åsk Wäppling, the founder behind the site, to Dagens Media.
She has posted a picture of lingerie from Sloggis advertising campaign. This has been on the blog for about seven years and she has complained that the advertising is sexist, but Google thought the picture was too daring.

What a deliciously clickable headline that is. Dagens Media notes that Adland has been banned by Google, for having nudity on the site. Specifically for a Sloggi ad from 2004 campaign as Googles mail states here. We find this to be hilarious right now, especially after we posted about big brands like Interflora still advertising on Kissie's homophobic hate-speech Nazi promoting blog because she apologized. Sorta. Moral of the story: hate speech okay, writing about sexist ads and depicting them, not okay.

Well, we can't have any google ads since we're apparently porn-peddlers anyway, which has put Google adsense in the "more trouble than they're worth" category. So we're banner-less now, and as you all know, I'm a softie at heart, so I decided to turn over our banner-spots to hemlösa banners (Homeless banners). It's a banner campaign created by Stockholms Stadsmission, and it hopes to inspire both large and small websites to help give homeless a roof over their heads.

You know that I've hated the Sloggi ass campaign with a passion, now it seems I have another reason to hate Sloggi. I just found this sweet message from Google adsense:


Hello,

While reviewing your account, we noticed that you are currently displaying Google ads in a manner that is not compliant with our policies. For instance, we found violations of AdSense policies on pages such as https://adland.tv/content/sloggi-another-bumfight. Please note that this URL is an example and that the same violations may exist on other pages of your website.

We're chuffed to find that the writer Valarie Potter at Computer world: Top 10 Super Bowl tech ads, actually waded through four decades worth of super bowl ads that we have in our super bowl archive to list some of the best, and cheesiest, tech ads. Compuserve "Not Busy" is a really good example of nostalgia-tech that our kids will never understand. Well done, and thanks for using adland.

Edit - looks like the same article appears in PCWorld as well. Cool.

Whoah, anyone who follows me ( @dabitch ) on twitter has had to cope with tweets at all hours lately and you might have been wondering why I stopped sleeping. Blame the Super Bowl Commercials archive for that. I wanted to make them all embeddable flash films instead of our old Quicktime fun, so I've been up all hours fixing things. It's now ready - for your surfing pleasure or for your personal "best of" / "Worst of" superbowlian lists in your blogs. I tweeted a "*phew*, all done" yesterday, @adfreak, @agencyspy, @GOOD and @coudal joined in, and suddenly that link was on fire.

Each page in the super bowl archive, for example the 1995 Super Bowl xxix is currently sorted by "Most visited today". Linking your favorite ad may actually send it up the list.

As you may know, we've been publishing the super bowl ads on super bowl Sunday since 1999, our archive has been the source for the New York Times, and come Sunday we'll do it again. Same procedure as last year, Miss Sophie? The same procedure as every year, James!

Related SB ad-fun:
Top five worst Super Bowl ads of all time
The oft forgotten Super Bowl gems
Ten great Super bowl commercials you forgot - or so bad that you wish you had.
A look back on super bowl ads past - NYT picks and Adland picks.

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