Opinion editorials on advertising and business

In a pointed post via medium, Firstborn ECD, David Snyder has written an extremely insightful post entitled "Dear Jr Creative…Earn Your Place. You’ll Be Better For It."

Snyder points out in no uncertain terms that a lot of juniors aren't willing to happily put in the grunt work to succeed. They're looking for a short cut despite being completely oblivious to business realities.

This is my favorite passage from the post:

By now most of you have heard Rolling Stone magazine generated controversy by featuring bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of its magazine as some tasty link bait. They then hid behind journalistic integrity like the cowards they are, not seeing the irony in link bait as being anything but journalistic integrity.

Regular people (you know: the consumer, the intended target, the potential readers of Rolling Stone, etc.) reacted with outrage on social media, and even created a Facebook Page to boycott them.

Now, I know, I know. I can hear you saying already: these boycotts never go anywhere. Right?

Earlier this month, Apple launched a new ad campaign after WWDC, with the first spot called "Our Signature". Every time I see it, I'm annoyed. Annoyed by the pompousness that exudes from it.

In an era of communications where brands are moving to be "less about me" and "more about the customer", this ad feels like it fell out of something from a grayed creative's notebook from 1955. And, at that time, perhaps it would have made more sense. But now, it feels arrogant, off-brand and self-serving.

A week ago, a freshly liver-transplanted Lou Reed made an appearance at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Reed weighed in on the quality of digital music, advertising, and, ahem, sharing :

On Advertising:

Unlike people who download things for free, these days things have changed, the advertising people actually pay you for what you did it's a startling turn of events. And people like the ads now..they like the ads, they like the music. It used to be thought of as selling out...now it's the opposite.

On Spotify:

You can find out all the answers to advertising's mysteries by asking questions. Ask the wrong questions though, you'll eventually be labeled a problem child. Despite acting like they have all the answers on a daily basis, no one in advertising really does. And a direct question is often seen as an offensive assault.

Look. I appreciate when women good at their jobs get the kudos they deserve, and I know there's a lot of people out there who should be getting more kudos and high-fives than they do. Congrats Anna Banks, at Organic, good on ya Sally Grimes at Hillshire, way to go Leeann Leahy at VIA, well done to the rest of you ladies as well.

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